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A Political Contradictionary from A to Z












LOBALIZATION as a term suggests a 'one-world' reality, with every nation in contact and trade with every other nation. Eduardo Galeano highlights the contradictions inherent in this reality:

"Globalization has considerably accelerated in recent years following the dizzying expansion of communications and transport and the equally stupefying transnational mergers of capital. We must not confuse globalization with 'internationalism' though. We know that the human condition is universal, that we share similar passions, fears, needs and dreams, but this has nothing to do with the 'rubbing out' of national borders as a result of unrestricted capital movements. One thing is the free movement of peoples, the other of money. This can be seen very clearly in such places as the border between Mexico and the United States which hardly exists as far as the flow of money and goods is concerned. Yet it stands as a kind of Berlin Wall or Great Wall of China when it comes to stopping people from getting across."

Eduardo Galeano, from an interview by Niels Boel

GOVERNMENT:
There is no nonsense so arrant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast majority by adequate governmental action.
Bertrand Russell

So they [the Government] go on in strange paradox, decided only to be undecided, resolved to be irresolute, adamant for drift, solid for fluidity, all-powerful to be impotent.
Sir Winston Churchill

Whenever you have an efficient government you have a dictatorship.
Harry S. Truman

G for Global warming, God and Graft
How to Guarantee Global warming: generate gases; graft golden gifts; ghettoize gossip, gut green guidance. Gaia GONE!

Globalization as exemplified by the 1965-66 overthrow of Sukarno in Indonesia. The raves in the newspapers, glossing over or ignoring the half million slaughtered. See also John Pilger on Z net

In the wake of the massacres, Indonesia's pre-eminent cultural and intellectual organisations - the Peoples' Cultural Institute, the National Cultural Institute, and the Indonesian Scholars' Association - were shut down, and many of their members were arrested or imprisoned. More than one and a half million Indonesians passed through a system of prisons and prison camps. The PKI was physically annihilated, and popular organisations associated with it were suppressed. The whole of Indonesian society was forcibly depoliticised. In village after village, local bureaucrats backed by the army imposed a control matrix of permits, rules and regulations. Citizens were required to obtain a "letter of clean circumstances" certifying that they and their extended families had not been associated with the left before 1965. Indonesian society became devoted to the prevention of any challenge to elite interests.